Seeizy makes waves through salt art

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Mamohlakola Letuka

FOR many years, artistes have used different materials to come up with different forms of visual artefacts. So diverse are the materials used that it is easy to come up with a new one each time one visits a gallery.

One such artiste who has taken experiments to another dimension is Pretoria based Mosotho, Seithleko “Seeizy” Seithleko, who has made a name for using salt in his art.

Where others have stretched their imagination and creativity to use all forms of beads, seeds, stones, wood and even litter, the Naleli born Seeizy says art has always been part of his life.

The artist who made waves locally after sharing American singer, Drake’s, salt portrait recalls his first drawing in pre-school.

“I was still in crèche, I remember, and I drew a purple cat that I was so proud of,’ he said.

“It was the first piece of art I took home and my mother also took a liking. I still have the image locked at the back of my head.”

Although he was young, the artist recalls the pride in his mother’s eyes when she saw the art work and would always brag to her friends.

He said he got encouragement to continue and graduated to cartooning and cars in his books through primary and secondary school.

Yet back then, art was just about having fun and exploring for him, until his family and friends started complementing his work.

After matric, he then took a year to focus on his talent and drew hordes of portraits.

“I did a lot of sketches during that time, and I fell deeper in love with visual arts,” he said.

Despite being a good artist, he never thought he would become famous for visual arts but instead, music, basketball or soccer as he also excelled in those areas.

“God blessed me with a lot of talent, most of which a lot of people don’t even know about. I always thought I’d grow up to be known for one of three things, either football, basketball or music,” Seeizy said.

“To me art was just about having fun and exploring in the beginning until I started getting compliments from my family for my work.

“My family’s support gave me confidence to put my work on social media and I never looked back from then.”

But how did the salt craft start?

The artist said he was inspired by salt pieces by an American artist that he saw on Facebook.

“It all started with a post I saw on Facebook. An American artist had done this wonderful piece of art using salt, and I was intrigued,” Seeizy said.

“I had never seen before. It was mind blowing and unique. I gave it a try and immediately fell in love with it. It is quick and easy for me.”

He said he also uses art as a therapy that he falls back on each time life knocks him down.

“Art is a culture, it is something I fall back on, especially in times of depression. It is more therapeutic than work.

“It is a way to express myself when words fail me and when I draw, I create my own world. It becomes a different world for me and there is always a sense of peace and calmness from drawing.”

He said art has helped him view life from a different perspective and has increased his patience.

Seeizy said he has learnt to follow his instincts and passions and that he has managed to gain support from the public, gives him joy.

“The support from Basotho and foreigners is overwhelming, I am touched by the love I have received,” he said.

Although he sells his work, the young artist says art is his long-term investment for him and he was focused on his brand more than income at this stage.

Visual art forms include ceramics, drawing, painting, sculptures, printmaking design, crafts, photography, video, filmmaking and architecture among many others.

It has also been used as a mode of communication in Africa and one can still find drawings and paintings by different tribes like the Khoisan in caves all over the continent.

 

 

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